Title: The Sunset of the Confederacy
Publisher: John W. Luce and Company, Boston
Date Published: 1912
Author: Morris Schaff
Keywords: Joshua Chamberlain, Lawrence Chamberlain, Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, General Gordon, Confederate, Surrender
Permissions: public domain
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Sunset of the Confederacy
by Morris Schaff, 1912

The author of this book, Morris Schaff, was not actually present for the scenes he describes. Though he served briefly as an aide-de-Camp for General Warren during the Battle of the Wilderness, at the Battle of Petersburg he was placed in command of an ordinance depot at City Point.1 The explosion of the depot, described on page 458 in the history of the 22nd Massachusetts Regiment ended Schaff's duty in the field. Though he remained in the army until 1871.

I'll jump you to the chapter that most pertains to Chamberlain, though there are other references to him in this book.

Chamberlain wrote a letter to Schaff after reading this book expressing his surprise at being so flatteringly portrayed. "Your passage on the 'spiritually real of this world,' and your association with it of any action or trait of mine, are like a command and consecration to me. I must live up to your appraisal."
    Chamberlain goes on to say that he is not sure where Schaff got his information but wonders if perhaps Schaff heard his speech Appomattox. Chamberlain relates that this speech is one of many taken from the early draft he started after the war while he was retained in the army, "in that softened mood of adjusting myself to the process of recovery from severe wounds." He expressed his intent to publish these in a book, which he did as The Passing of the Armies2

    On page 299 Schaff wishes he can be in hearing when taps is played at Chamberlain's funeral. He was, as reported by the Bowdoin Orient
1Morris Schaff
2Coulka, Jeremiah. The Grand old Man of Maine. pg 293 - 295.